The House that Witchy Built by Dianne de Las Casas – Review and Giveaway

This cute, cute Halloween addition by Dianne de Las Casas  and illustrated by Holly Stone-Barker is a take on “The House that Jack Built”.  I know, there are a thousand and one stories built on this framework, but there must be a reason. When Halloween rolled around in my library, the perennial favorite of my kindergarteners (and 1st and 2nd graders) was The House that Drac Built by Judy Sierra and illustrated by Will Hillenbrand. Not only because of the myriad of scary creatures but because of the repetition, repetition, repetition. I can’t speak for the rest of the world but my students always LOVED saying the story with me. Ah, the sneakiness of new vocabulary deftly dropped into a familiar chant.

But I digress … The House that Witchy Built (Pelican Publishing, 2011) delivers on its promise of Halloween fun, including sound effects for each story element. Between the creaking, rattling, flapping, cackling and smooching – yes, I said smooching – the reader will hardly be able to hear himself above the din. Holly Stone-Barker uses cut paper and collage for the artwork. Have I ever said how much I like this technique? Well, alot, especially for lower elementary stories. Just look at the cover – kids are going to pick that right up – and every page is just as inviting. (more…)

13 Curses by Michelle Harrison – Review and Giveaway

Much as I love fantasy, I am woefully ignorant of fairy lore. So when I pulled 13 Curses (Little Brown, 2011) by Michelle Harrison out of a box of ARC’s I received from Hachette Book Group, I found I was in for an education. I really enjoyed this book! The backstory kept referring to so many events I realized I must be missing something, so I did a little research and discovered 13 Curses is #2 in a trilogy by this British author. The first was 13 Treasures (Little Brown, 2010). Harrison fills in very nicely, so the reader can enjoy the story on its own.

Red is a loner, and a fugitive (owing to her involvement in the fairy foundling trade in the previous book). She is determined to find her own young brother who was snatched by fairies from the orphanage. Her story is intertwined with that of Tanya, who can see fairies (a rare talent), and has had her own dealings with their realm (again from 13 Treasures).  The girls and Tayna’s friend Fabian  come together to hunt for the titular 13 Curses, represented by the charms ripped from a bracelet given to Tanya by her grandmother. Finding these cursed charms is the only chance Red has of recovering her stolen brother – and their time is running out. The fairies don’t seem too concerned about playing nice and the hidden charms become more perilous as the seconds tick by – Red and her friends are in serious danger.

The suspense is great and the fairy lore is rather dark. I stayed up till the wee hours reading this one. Hachette has a nice PR campaign going and a neat website devoted to the trilogy. I can’t wait to get my hands on the final installment 13 Secrets. I smell a movie …

I’ll be giving my copy away to one lucky person. Leave a comment on this post by midnight on August 28th and you’ll be included in my random drawing. If this is your first comment to my blog, the comment will not post until I approve it. It’s a great book to have on your to-be-read pile. Share the contest with anyone who might be interested.

Genres: Midgrade, YA, Fantasy, Fairy Tales

Things to like about this book: It is very good fantasy! The story is suspenseful and I enjoyed the mythology very much. Rowan grows tremendously as a character and she embraces her positive characteristics – choosing a place to belong and learning to love those around her.

Audience: Middle School and early YA. The real and described violence, seriously menacing tone, kidnappings, and loss of family would make me hesitate before putting it into 3rd grader’s hands.

Reviewed from: ARC provided by publisher.

Shoes for Me! by Sue Fliess – Review and Giveaway

Last week I had a wonderful surprise on my doorstep, courtesy of Pinwheel Books, a division of Marshall Cavendish. Shoes for Me! (2011) is a delightful rhyming picture book by Sue Fliess. She really gets it right in this debut story for the preschool, kinder, and early childhood set.

In Shoes for Me!, Hippo is off to the store with her mom for new shoes – and she gets to make the choice. Oh, the power! The young fashionista goes through every shoe in the store before her mom threatens  to leave without a purchase. That gets our girl’s attention and she finally makes her selection. Mike Laughead‘s bright and snappy illustrations go well with the clipped rhythm of the short text.

The colors, patterns, and types of shoes in the story lend themselves to a multitude of classroom activities – and the importance of making a choice is a lesson in and of itself. Nice work, Sue. I can’t wait to see what happens when Hippo goes clothes shopping in next year’s A Dress for Me!

I’ll be giving my copy away to one lucky person. Leave a comment on this post by August 19th and you’ll be included in my random drawing.  If this is your first comment to my blog, the comment will not post until I approve it. It’s a great book for the younger set. If you don’t have any young children hanging around your house you could share it with a preschool teacher or librarian. Feel free to pass the contest on to anyone who might be interested.

Genres: Picture Books, Rhyming Books

Things to like about this book: Great rhyme! It’s fun and colorful and makes a great read aloud.

Audience: Toddlers, Preschool, kindergarten, 1st grade. Also great for parents looking for a quick bedtime read.

Reviewed from: Hardcover provided by publisher.

Dry Souls by Denise Getson – Review and Giveaway

Long overdue, I’m posting my review of fellow CBAY author Denise Getson’s debut midgrade Dry Souls. I met Denise at the TLA Conference in late April and I thoroughly enjoyed her novel. As a fan of dystopia, I found her future world where the lack of usable water resources creates a society in crisis is well written and very believable. It is somewhat gentler than the YA dystopias of the last few years – which I think middle school parents, librarians, and teachers will appreciate.

The heroine, Kira, is a lonely orphan who discovers she can call water forth from the earth. The book follows her as she sets out to discover her past and how she might be able to use this skill to help her dying world. But it wouldn’t be a dystopian novel if the powers that be left Kira alone to save the planet. As she journeys through her own self discovery, she learns how to be a friend and whom not to trust. Well done, Denise. I’m hoping the sequel is on the editor’s desk!

I’ll be giving my copy away to one lucky person. Leave a comment on this post by August 10th and you’ll be included in my random drawing. If this is your first comment to my blog, the comment will not post until I approve it.  It’s a great book to have on your to-be-read pile. Pass the contest on to anyone who might be interested.

Genres: Midgrade, Science Fiction, Fantasy

Things to like about this book: It is well written and the characters are believable. Their struggle is compelling and I wanted to stay up late and finish it – it takes alot for me to read late into the evening – so that’s saying something!

Audience: Middle School and possibly upper elementary. Give to those 6th graders who aren’t yet ready for the bigger YA dystopias.

Reviewed from: Paperback provided by publisher.